Women march on D.C. in solidarity

Mike Colegrove, Staff Writer, and James McClendon, Editor-in-Chief

Following President Donald Trump’s inauguration, there have been many political protests and movements that have drawn people from all over the country to the nation’s capital.

On Jan. 21, The Women’s March in Washington, D.C. took place. Utica College Journalism Professor Mary Christopher attended the march where almost one million people filled the National Mall.

According to Christopher, the rally was four hours long and those in attendance were ready to march at the end of the rally. Christopher said she was encouraged by the large number of men and women who wanted to show their support for gender equality and human rights.

“So many people were outraged by Trump’s campaign and his victory,” Christopher said. “I wasn’t surprised that there was such a global protest.”

Gloria Steinem was one of Christopher’s favorite speakers because she has been an influential women’s rights activist for decades.

The throngs of people created an enthusiastic mood during the DC march.

“There was a lot of chanting yet it was very peaceful,” Christopher said. “Everyone was in support of human rights, so you felt a camaraderie in the massive crowd. Everyone wanted their voices heard and they had the opportunity to do so.”

Sophomore Hermina Garic also went to D.C. to be a part of this historic event.

“I knew I needed to go to the march as soon as I heard that it was happening,” Garic said. “Social activism has always been one of my passions.”

Much like Christopher, she felt a strong connection with every person in attendance.

“The Women’s March on Washington was an empowering event,” Garic said. “I felt connected to every individual that was marching. It felt like citizens owned the country together. We were all taking a powerful stance on social issues.”

Deborah Wilson-Allam, the UC director of international programs, said that this march was just the first step in the battle to create social change.

“I knew that this was just the beginning of a political and social movement that could bring about great change,” Wilson-Allam said. “It could fizzle out without sustained activism and it’s up to us to prepare for the long fight by pacing ourselves and committing to on-going actions to achieve the goals we want.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s